About Me

My photo
Mumbai, India
I'm a landrace dog fancier, birder and amateur arachnologist. I'm also a wildlife conservationist working in the tiger reserves of central India with Satpuda Foundation. Founder of the INDog Project (www.indog.co.in) and the INDog Club. I worked with urban free-ranging dogs of Mumbai for 14 years.

This blog is for aboriginal breed enthusiasts. It is part of the INDog Project www.indog.co.in. Only INDogs (Indian Pariah) and INDog-mix mongrels are featured here. The two are NOT the same, do please read the text on the right to understand the difference. Our aim: to create awareness about the primitive natural breed called the Indian Pariah Dog/INDog. I sometimes feature other landrace breeds too.

Thursday, April 2, 2009

Gule













Little Gule belongs to Rittika Ray. He was born near her house in Kolkata, next to a park.

Rittika has always been an INDog fan. In her own words, "Pariah dogs are the most intelligent and communicative breed."

I don't think any of us would argue with that. Only dogs with a higher-order intelligence can survive in a harsh human-dominated environment, and pariah dogs are descended from thousands of generations of such clever dogs, over thousands of years. I've never come across a stupid one. I am still awed by the skill with which they manoeuvre their way around our not-very-nice world; somehow hanging in there in spite of everything, and now and then even getting the good life they deserve.


Gule became Rittika's pet two weeks ago and has won over all her family members with his smartness and of course his good looks! He house-trained himself in just two days - quite remarkable even for this breed. He hasn't been given a proper name yet. "Gule" is his nickname, derived from a Bengali word which means round and chubby.

In case anyone is wondering why we've had a number of puppies on the blog lately - INDogs, like primitive breeds everywhere, have a seasonal breeding cycle, with most mating taking place in the late monsoon and pups being born in winter. The old Indian belief that the monsoon months are the canine "mating season" is actually true, though with increasing mongrelization in city dogs, the pattern is changing. Still, there are many pups needing homes right now...I hope at least some of them will be as lucky as Gule and our other new Club members.

Photos: Rittika Ray
Kolkata

1 comment:

Lubna said...

It is so nice to drop by and see all the new baby members.